Exciting new features in Microsoft Social Engagement 2016 Update 1

Brace yourself – Microsoft Social Engagement 2016 Update 1 is just around the corner. We’re excited to share the news on the features and improvements we’re about to launch.

Publish tweets and posts to Facebook pages from Social Center

In addition to the reactive interactions, Social Engagement now enables you to compose new tweets or Facebook posts directly from Social Center. All you need is an authenticated Social Profile in Social Engagement to start reaching out to your audience immediately! 

New sentiment and app languages introduced

Get in touch with your audience using Turkish language. The acquisition of social posts, the application interface and sentiment calculation are now available for Turkish besides the already available languages for the application interface and sentiment calculation. With this release, we’re now covering 20 search languages for data acquisition as well as 15 languages for application translations for sentiment processing. For more information about the languages that Social Engagement is translated into, see the Microsoft Social Engagement Translation Guide.

Improved language detection with Microsoft Translator

Social Engagement now makes use of the Microsoft Translator (API) to provide improved language detection for all available languages in collaboration with Bing. Posts that were found so far without a pre-defined language from data acquisition are analyzed and if possible get categorized in one of our 20 available languages.

Filtering for posts linked to Dynamics CRM 

Social Engagement now allows filtering for posts that are either linked or not linked to CRM. Apply a filter for your data set and find linked posts quickly. Build streams and workflows to track the posts that require your attention.

Service and performance improvements

Availability and performance are key aspects of an online service. With growing usage, the architecture needs the flexibility to scale quickly when required. In collaboration with the Microsoft Azure team, we’re constantly investing in our infrastructure. We’ve migrated critical parts of the service to new generation high-performance hardware and upgraded the ElasticSearch index to the latest version. This results in faster loading times for widgets and pages in the application. Additionally, we have tweaked the queries done by the application to make bulk actions on larger number of posts complete faster than ever before. We’re committed to continue our investments in this area and strive for pushing performance to the next level. 

Enjoy!

Microsoft Social Engagement Team

Brace yourself – Microsoft Social Engagement 2016 Update 1 is just around the corner. We’re excited to share the news on the features and improvements we’re about to launch.

Publish tweets and posts to Facebook pages from Social Center

In addition to the reactive interactions, Social Engagement now enables you to compose new tweets or Facebook posts directly from Social Center. All you need is an authenticated Social Profile in Social Engagement to start reaching out to your audience immediately! 

New sentiment and app languages introduced

Get in touch with your audience using Turkish language. The acquisition of social posts, the application interface and sentiment calculation are now available for Turkish besides the already available languages for the application interface and sentiment calculation. With this release, we’re now covering 20 search languages for data acquisition as well as 15 languages for application translations for sentiment processing. For more information about the languages that Social Engagement is translated into, see the Microsoft Social Engagement Translation Guide.

Improved language detection with Microsoft Translator

Social Engagement now makes use of the Microsoft Translator (API) to provide improved language detection for all available languages in collaboration with Bing. Posts that were found so far without a pre-defined language from data acquisition are analyzed and if possible get categorized in one of our 20 available languages.

Filtering for posts linked to Dynamics CRM 

Social Engagement now allows filtering for posts that are either linked or not linked to CRM. Apply a filter for your data set and find linked posts quickly. Build streams and workflows to track the posts that require your attention.

Service and performance improvements

Availability and performance are key aspects of an online service. With growing usage, the architecture needs the flexibility to scale quickly when required. In collaboration with the Microsoft Azure team, we’re constantly investing in our infrastructure. We’ve migrated critical parts of the service to new generation high-performance hardware and upgraded the ElasticSearch index to the latest version. This results in faster loading times for widgets and pages in the application. Additionally, we have tweaked the queries done by the application to make bulk actions on larger number of posts complete faster than ever before. We’re committed to continue our investments in this area and strive for pushing performance to the next level. 

Enjoy!

Microsoft Social Engagement Team


Source;

New Server-Side Sync Setup Guide

We are pleased to announce the release of a new setup guide: Server side synchronization for CRM Online with Exchange Server.

This setup guide will take you step by step and guide you how to prepare Exchange Server, and how to configure CRM Online with Exchange Server.

Have questions? Feedback? Drop us a line to crmssspm@microsoft.com

We are pleased to announce the release of a new setup guide: Server side synchronization for CRM Online with Exchange Server.

This setup guide will take you step by step and guide you how to prepare Exchange Server, and how to configure CRM Online with Exchange Server.

Have questions? Feedback? Drop us a line to crmssspm@microsoft.com


Source;

Dynamics CRM 2016 Knowledge Article Translations

Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016’s new knowledge management offering allows you to easily create, publish and manage knowledge articles for your organization. Often you might want to publish the same article to multiple different languages. To solve this issue, CRM 2016 allows you to create and publish translated versions of your article.

Let’s walk through a simple example – say you’ve created an article titled “Upgrade Instructions” in English, and would like to also provide Spanish translation of your article. Start by opening up the latest English version of your article, and selecting the “Translate” ribbon button on the top ribbon bar.

Doing this opens a dialog where you can set the language of the new translation – in this case, to Spanish.

Note, the available languages are independent of which language packs you have installed. There are 164 possible languages out of box, and you can disable languages you don’t want so show up as options for your organization.

After hitting Create, you’ll be forwarded to the edit form for the new article translation. This will copy over the certain fields, like title and content, from the English version to the new Spanish version. Note that the actual translation of the text is manual, not automatic, so you’ll have to still translate the text yourself.

Once you finish translating the article text from English to Spanish, it’s time to move the article through the rest of its lifecycle. This occurs like any other article – see the Lifecycle blog for more details. Translations do have one difference in the lifecycle: you can publish or schedule a translation in multiple ways. The first way is the same as any other article – just click the “Publish” ribbon button on the top. You’ll notice there’s one extra option in the dialog for publishing – a yes/no option for “When publishing this translation, inherit product associations from the related primary article.” Selecting yes for this option will copy any product associations on the English article to the Spanish article. If you’ve already set the product associations for the English article, this will save you some time.

The other option is to publish our Spanish translation right with the English version. If you click the “Publish” ribbon on the English article, there will be a yes/no option on the resulting dialog for “Publish approved related translations with article.” Selecting yes for this option will cause your Spanish article to be published at the same time as your English article. The other options you select in the publish dialog will also be inherited by the Spanish article, such as expiration date or publish status.

The translation is directly tied to the major and minor version of the primary article you created it from. You can update or create new major or minor versions for the translation, and it will still be tied to the original primary article you created it from. You can see all the translations of a primary article by going to the Related Translations grid in the Summary tab. See #Versions# for more information of article versioning.

Regards,

Justin Terry

 

Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016’s new knowledge management offering allows you to easily create, publish and manage knowledge articles for your organization. Often you might want to publish the same article to multiple different languages. To solve this issue, CRM 2016 allows you to create and publish translated versions of your article.

Let’s walk through a simple example – say you’ve created an article titled “Upgrade Instructions” in English, and would like to also provide Spanish translation of your article. Start by opening up the latest English version of your article, and selecting the “Translate” ribbon button on the top ribbon bar.

Doing this opens a dialog where you can set the language of the new translation – in this case, to Spanish.

Note, the available languages are independent of which language packs you have installed. There are 164 possible languages out of box, and you can disable languages you don’t want so show up as options for your organization.

After hitting Create, you’ll be forwarded to the edit form for the new article translation. This will copy over the certain fields, like title and content, from the English version to the new Spanish version. Note that the actual translation of the text is manual, not automatic, so you’ll have to still translate the text yourself.

Once you finish translating the article text from English to Spanish, it’s time to move the article through the rest of its lifecycle. This occurs like any other article – see the Lifecycle blog for more details. Translations do have one difference in the lifecycle: you can publish or schedule a translation in multiple ways. The first way is the same as any other article – just click the “Publish” ribbon button on the top. You’ll notice there’s one extra option in the dialog for publishing – a yes/no option for “When publishing this translation, inherit product associations from the related primary article.” Selecting yes for this option will copy any product associations on the English article to the Spanish article. If you’ve already set the product associations for the English article, this will save you some time.

The other option is to publish our Spanish translation right with the English version. If you click the “Publish” ribbon on the English article, there will be a yes/no option on the resulting dialog for “Publish approved related translations with article.” Selecting yes for this option will cause your Spanish article to be published at the same time as your English article. The other options you select in the publish dialog will also be inherited by the Spanish article, such as expiration date or publish status.

The translation is directly tied to the major and minor version of the primary article you created it from. You can update or create new major or minor versions for the translation, and it will still be tied to the original primary article you created it from. You can see all the translations of a primary article by going to the Related Translations grid in the Summary tab. See #Versions# for more information of article versioning.

Regards,

Justin Terry

 


Source;

Using Queues with Knowledge Management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 release

Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 brings a new Knowledge Management solution to help organizations in offering great customer service. It comes with rich content authoring and workflow capabilities to manage knowledge articles in the interactive service hub. Please refer to blog New Knowledge Management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 release to know more about Knowledge management in 2016 release.

Adding to the Knowledge Management out-of-the-box capabilities, CRM users can further accelerate knowledge articles authoring even better by using CRM Queues. This blog will walk you through the steps on using queues in the context of knowledge articles.

  • Organization Contoso is launching new products, and is creating knowledge articles to help their customer service representatives in providing information to customers.
  • Contoso wants the articles written by content authors. Once the authors are done writing the articles, they should be reviewed by knowledge managers before they are published.
  • As the volume of articles is going to be high, Contoso is looking for a simpler way of getting this accomplished.
  • Contoso leverages CRM queues to achieve this.

 

Following are the details of the approach.

  • Contoso has identified the following two roles to manage knowledge articles for its products
    • Content author- responsible for authoring the knowledge articles and publishing them.
    • Knowledge managers- responsible for reviewing the knowledge articles content before the articles are published by author.

Note: Knowledge manager is a new role introduced in this release. A knowledge manager is the person who is responsible for managing the knowledge articles.

  • As Contoso is planning to release multiple new products, and is expecting high volume of knowledge articles to be reviewed, they decide to use CRM queues to better manage the review process of the articles.

Note: Use queues to organize, prioritize, and monitor the progress of your work. In Microsoft Dynamics CRM, queues are containers to store anything that needs to be completed or requires an action.

Contoso creates a new queue “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” and the purpose of this queue is to contain all the articles that are ready for review.

“Knowledge Article Approval Queue” queue is accessible only to Knowledge Managers. After completing the article, content Authors can add their articles to this queue.

Knowledge Managers monitor the queue, and review the completed articles and approve so that authors can publish them.

Prerequisites

  • Contoso has identified users who are “Content Authors” and “Knowledge Managers”.
  • Contoso has created a queue with the name “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” keeping it private and only accessible to “Knowledge Managers”.
  • Content authors have created few new articles that are ready to add to queue for review.

Steps

Author adds completed article to the Knowledge Article Approval queue

1.  In the interactive service hub, log on as a content author.
2.  Navigate to Service > Knowledge Articles, and open the article that’s complete and ready for review.

 

3.  Click the Author stage and set the Mark for Review field to “Completed”.

4.  Click “Add to Queue” action from the command bar.

5.  Select the queue, and click Add.

Please note that this is the queue that you must have created as part of the prerequisites.

Knowledge manager picks the article for review from the queue and approves it 

1.  Log on as a knowledge manager in the interactive service hub.

2.  Navigate to Service > Queue Items.

3.  Select the query “All Items”.

4.  Choose the queue “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” from the drop-down. 

This shows the list of items available in the queue.

5.  Pick the knowledge article that’s added to the queue by the author. To do this, click the “Pick” button on the command bar.

6.  In the Pick dialog box, click the “Pick” button to assign the article to yourself.

7.  Now you can see the “Worked By” column populated with your name. Open the article by clicking the article title from the list of records.

8.  Review the article, and approve it by clicking the “Approve” button on the command bar.

Author publishes the approved article

1.  Log on as a content author in the interactive service hub.
2.  Navigate to Service > Knowledge Articles, and open the article that is approved by the Knowledge Manager.
3.  In the article, click “Publish” on the command bar.

This opens the Publish dialog box. Provide the required details, and confirm the action to publish.

Regards,

Srinivas Rao Pittla Venkata

 

Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 brings a new Knowledge Management solution to help organizations in offering great customer service. It comes with rich content authoring and workflow capabilities to manage knowledge articles in the interactive service hub. Please refer to blog New Knowledge Management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 release to know more about Knowledge management in 2016 release.

Adding to the Knowledge Management out-of-the-box capabilities, CRM users can further accelerate knowledge articles authoring even better by using CRM Queues. This blog will walk you through the steps on using queues in the context of knowledge articles.

  • Organization Contoso is launching new products, and is creating knowledge articles to help their customer service representatives in providing information to customers.
  • Contoso wants the articles written by content authors. Once the authors are done writing the articles, they should be reviewed by knowledge managers before they are published.
  • As the volume of articles is going to be high, Contoso is looking for a simpler way of getting this accomplished.
  • Contoso leverages CRM queues to achieve this.

 

Following are the details of the approach.

  • Contoso has identified the following two roles to manage knowledge articles for its products
    • Content author- responsible for authoring the knowledge articles and publishing them.
    • Knowledge managers- responsible for reviewing the knowledge articles content before the articles are published by author.

Note: Knowledge manager is a new role introduced in this release. A knowledge manager is the person who is responsible for managing the knowledge articles.

  • As Contoso is planning to release multiple new products, and is expecting high volume of knowledge articles to be reviewed, they decide to use CRM queues to better manage the review process of the articles.

Note: Use queues to organize, prioritize, and monitor the progress of your work. In Microsoft Dynamics CRM, queues are containers to store anything that needs to be completed or requires an action.

Contoso creates a new queue “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” and the purpose of this queue is to contain all the articles that are ready for review.

“Knowledge Article Approval Queue” queue is accessible only to Knowledge Managers. After completing the article, content Authors can add their articles to this queue.

Knowledge Managers monitor the queue, and review the completed articles and approve so that authors can publish them.

Prerequisites

  • Contoso has identified users who are “Content Authors” and “Knowledge Managers”.
  • Contoso has created a queue with the name “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” keeping it private and only accessible to “Knowledge Managers”.
  • Content authors have created few new articles that are ready to add to queue for review.

Steps

Author adds completed article to the Knowledge Article Approval queue

1.  In the interactive service hub, log on as a content author.
2.  Navigate to Service > Knowledge Articles, and open the article that’s complete and ready for review.

 

3.  Click the Author stage and set the Mark for Review field to “Completed”.

4.  Click “Add to Queue” action from the command bar.

5.  Select the queue, and click Add.

Please note that this is the queue that you must have created as part of the prerequisites.

Knowledge manager picks the article for review from the queue and approves it 

1.  Log on as a knowledge manager in the interactive service hub.

2.  Navigate to Service > Queue Items.

3.  Select the query “All Items”.

4.  Choose the queue “Knowledge Article Approval Queue” from the drop-down. 

This shows the list of items available in the queue.

5.  Pick the knowledge article that’s added to the queue by the author. To do this, click the “Pick” button on the command bar.

6.  In the Pick dialog box, click the “Pick” button to assign the article to yourself.

7.  Now you can see the “Worked By” column populated with your name. Open the article by clicking the article title from the list of records.

8.  Review the article, and approve it by clicking the “Approve” button on the command bar.

Author publishes the approved article

1.  Log on as a content author in the interactive service hub.
2.  Navigate to Service > Knowledge Articles, and open the article that is approved by the Knowledge Manager.
3.  In the article, click “Publish” on the command bar.

This opens the Publish dialog box. Provide the required details, and confirm the action to publish.

Regards,

Srinivas Rao Pittla Venkata

 


Source;

CRM for phones express support going away

Microsoft Dynamics CRM currently has two phone apps available in the market:

  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones express

Going forward, newer versions of CRM won’t support CRM for phones express, but will only provide support for the newer version of the app, currently named “Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones,” in the app markets.

The newer app, which has a similar look and feel to our CRM for tablets app, gives you:

  • Offline capabilities
  • Business rules and business logic
  • Full forms instead of mobile forms
  • Quick create experiences
  • And more!

Learn more about the newer mobile app

Availability

In the app marketplace, you’ll still see CRM for phones express, which continues to work with previous versions of CRM. However, we will no longer provide support for CRM for phones express for newer phone OS versions or functionality enhancements. The express version isn’t available for CRM Online 2016 Update (version 8.0) or later releases.

The newer CRM for phones app will be available for CRM Online 2015 Update 1 (version 7.1) and CRM Online 2016 Update.

Get the newer phone apps here:

 

Microsoft Dynamics CRM currently has two phone apps available in the market:

  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones
  • Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones express

Going forward, newer versions of CRM won’t support CRM for phones express, but will only provide support for the newer version of the app, currently named “Microsoft Dynamics CRM for phones,” in the app markets.

The newer app, which has a similar look and feel to our CRM for tablets app, gives you:

  • Offline capabilities
  • Business rules and business logic
  • Full forms instead of mobile forms
  • Quick create experiences
  • And more!

Learn more about the newer mobile app

Availability

In the app marketplace, you’ll still see CRM for phones express, which continues to work with previous versions of CRM. However, we will no longer provide support for CRM for phones express for newer phone OS versions or functionality enhancements. The express version isn’t available for CRM Online 2016 Update (version 8.0) or later releases.

The newer CRM for phones app will be available for CRM Online 2015 Update 1 (version 7.1) and CRM Online 2016 Update.

Get the newer phone apps here:

 


Source;

Building xRM solutions: a three-part video series

We’re pleased to announce a three-part video series for building xRM solutions.  In this series, you’ll get an end-to-end walk through of the key extensibility capabilities (xRM) of Microsoft Dynamics CRM that allow you to build line of business (LOB) applications.

Building xRM Solutions I: Introduction

Dynamics CRM’s capabilities can be leveraged to build line of business applications, managing any relationship and interaction versus customer relationships and interactions.  In this video, we’ll walk through the the xRM framework within CRM, including:

  • Rapid application development
  • Business process management
  • Business intelligence
  • User experience

Building xRM Solutions II: Configuration

In this video, the terms configuration and customization are used interchangeably, and refer to an iterative process of defining the data model, security model, navigation, forms and views, business process flows, business rules, business process automation, and solution packaging.

Building xRM Solutions III: Code

In this video, we’ll cover four main concepts to consider when extending CRM to build a xRM solution:

  • Client extensions
  • Server extensions
  • Integration
  • Custom user experiences

Enjoy!

David Yack @davidyack

Marc Schweigert @devkeydet

We’re pleased to announce a three-part video series for building xRM solutions.  In this series, you’ll get an end-to-end walk through of the key extensibility capabilities (xRM) of Microsoft Dynamics CRM that allow you to build line of business (LOB) applications.

Building xRM Solutions I: Introduction

Dynamics CRM’s capabilities can be leveraged to build line of business applications, managing any relationship and interaction versus customer relationships and interactions.  In this video, we’ll walk through the the xRM framework within CRM, including:

  • Rapid application development
  • Business process management
  • Business intelligence
  • User experience

Building xRM Solutions II: Configuration

In this video, the terms configuration and customization are used interchangeably, and refer to an iterative process of defining the data model, security model, navigation, forms and views, business process flows, business rules, business process automation, and solution packaging.

Building xRM Solutions III: Code

In this video, we’ll cover four main concepts to consider when extending CRM to build a xRM solution:

  • Client extensions
  • Server extensions
  • Integration
  • Custom user experiences

Enjoy!

David Yack @davidyack

Marc Schweigert @devkeydet


Source;

Debugging custom JavaScript code in CRM using browser developer tools

You can use JavaScript in Microsoft Dynamics CRM to perform actions in form scripts, command bar (ribbon) commands, and web resources. More information: Use JavaScript with Microsoft Dynamics CRM

Each browser provides you with a debugging tool to help you debug your custom JavaScript code natively in the browser. Typically, you activate debugging in your browser by pressing the F12 key to display the native developer tool used for debugging.

In This Post

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM web client

Debugging your JavaScript code for Interactive Service Hub client

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM mobile clients

Browser Developer Tools Reference

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM web client

When you use a custom JavaScript library with the CRM web client, the library is loaded with the page, and you can view it in the browser developer tools to set break points, and examine the variables as the code executes to debug your JavaScript code.

For example, on Microsoft Edge, the custom JavaScript library becomes available in the Debugger tab.

On Google Chrome, the custom JavaScript library is available in the Sources tab.

For more information, see Debugging JavaScript in Microsoft Dynamics CRM.

Debugging your code for Interactive Service Hub client

When you use a custom JavaScript file or library with the new Interactive Service Hub client (introduced in CRM 2016), instead of loading your custom JavaScript library with the web page, CRM dynamically injects the contents of the custom JavaScript library in a dynamic library in the app. Developers cannot set break points on their custom code because every time the page is reloaded, the custom JavaScript code is injected into one of the dynamic libraries which will prevent the specified break point to be hit.

In this case, you could use any of the following techniques to debug your dynamic JavaScript code. Please be aware that this is not a comprehensive list, but provides some of the ways that can be helpful in debugging your dynamic JavaScript code. All the methods listed below might not work the same across all the browsers supported by CRM, and you must research around to see what suits best as per your requirement.

  • Test your JavaScript code using the CRM web client. As the code is not dynamically injected on the CRM web client, it is convenient to locate the script and set break points for easy debugging as explained earlier.
  • Set your debugger in the browser developer tool to break/pause even on handled or caught exceptions because CRM catches exception in the custom JavaScript library. For example:
    • On Microsoft Edge, select Break on All Exceptions in the Debugger tab:
    • On Google Chrome, select the Pause on Caught Exceptions check box in the Sources tab.
  • Use try and catch statements in your code to test and execute a block of code and handle the error, if any. In the catch statement, you can output the exception details using the console.log() statement. For example, in the following sample code, ‘adddlert’ is undefined, and the resulting error details (message, description, stack trace) will be displayed in the console:

    try {
     adddlert(“Hello world!”);
    }
    catch(err) {
     console.log(err);
    }

  • You can use the Breakpoints in Dynamic JavaScript capability in Google Chrome for debugging dynamic script by providing a name for your dynamic script, so that the script becomes available in the Sources tab allowing you to set break points to easily debug the code.

    For this to work, you need to provide the following comment at the end of your script:

    //# sourceURL=dynamicScript.js

    For example, here is a sample JavaScript code:

    function test() {
     console.log(“test”);
    }

    //# sourceURL=dynamicScript.js

    This will result in the dynamic file showing up in the Sources tab with the following name: dynamicScript.js.

    You’ll need to navigate once to the page to set the break point. The break point is hit even when you hit the refresh command or when you navigate in or out of the page.

    NOTE: This method only works with Google Chrome.

  • Copy and run your code directly in the Console tab of the browser developer tool to test and make changes to your code as required. You might have to switch to the multi-line mode in the Console tab of your browser dev tools to run your code if it does not support multiple lines of code by default.
    For more information about the multi-line mode in Microsoft Edge, see the The multiline command line section in Console Tool.

  • Add a debugger statement at the beginning of your script and dynamically add break points once the debugger statement is hit. You’ll however need to add the break points every time you load the page (via navigation or refresh command). This works best if you are trying to debug onChange handlers since the debug points persist so long as you are on the page. For more information, see JavaScript debugger Statement.

    NOTE: Remember to remove the debugger statement after you have tested and fixed all the issues in your JavaScript code, and are ready to publish your library in CRM.

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM mobile clients

As with the Interactive Service Hub client, CRM injects your custom JavaScript code into one of the dynamic libraries, so you face the same challenge in debugging your code. However, the instructions to debug code for CRM mobile clients are different than the Interactive Service Hub client. For more information, see Debugging scripts for CRM for tablets.

Browser Developer Tools Reference

Developer Tools in Microsoft Edge

Developer Tools in Microsoft Internet Explorer

Developer Tools in Google Chrome

Developer Tool in Mozilla Firefox

Developer Tools in Apple Safari (Web Inspector)

 


Microsoft Dynamics CRM SDK Documentation Team

You can use JavaScript in Microsoft Dynamics CRM to perform actions in form scripts, command bar (ribbon) commands, and web resources. More information: Use JavaScript with Microsoft Dynamics CRM

Each browser provides you with a debugging tool to help you debug your custom JavaScript code natively in the browser. Typically, you activate debugging in your browser by pressing the F12 key to display the native developer tool used for debugging.

In This Post

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM web client

Debugging your JavaScript code for Interactive Service Hub client

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM mobile clients

Browser Developer Tools Reference

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM web client

When you use a custom JavaScript library with the CRM web client, the library is loaded with the page, and you can view it in the browser developer tools to set break points, and examine the variables as the code executes to debug your JavaScript code.

For example, on Microsoft Edge, the custom JavaScript library becomes available in the Debugger tab.

On Google Chrome, the custom JavaScript library is available in the Sources tab.

For more information, see Debugging JavaScript in Microsoft Dynamics CRM.

Debugging your code for Interactive Service Hub client

When you use a custom JavaScript file or library with the new Interactive Service Hub client (introduced in CRM 2016), instead of loading your custom JavaScript library with the web page, CRM dynamically injects the contents of the custom JavaScript library in a dynamic library in the app. Developers cannot set break points on their custom code because every time the page is reloaded, the custom JavaScript code is injected into one of the dynamic libraries which will prevent the specified break point to be hit.

In this case, you could use any of the following techniques to debug your dynamic JavaScript code. Please be aware that this is not a comprehensive list, but provides some of the ways that can be helpful in debugging your dynamic JavaScript code. All the methods listed below might not work the same across all the browsers supported by CRM, and you must research around to see what suits best as per your requirement.

  • Test your JavaScript code using the CRM web client. As the code is not dynamically injected on the CRM web client, it is convenient to locate the script and set break points for easy debugging as explained earlier.
  • Set your debugger in the browser developer tool to break/pause even on handled or caught exceptions because CRM catches exception in the custom JavaScript library. For example:
    • On Microsoft Edge, select Break on All Exceptions in the Debugger tab:
    • On Google Chrome, select the Pause on Caught Exceptions check box in the Sources tab.
  • Use try and catch statements in your code to test and execute a block of code and handle the error, if any. In the catch statement, you can output the exception details using the console.log() statement. For example, in the following sample code, ‘adddlert’ is undefined, and the resulting error details (message, description, stack trace) will be displayed in the console:

    try {
     adddlert(“Hello world!”);
    }
    catch(err) {
     console.log(err);
    }

  • You can use the Breakpoints in Dynamic JavaScript capability in Google Chrome for debugging dynamic script by providing a name for your dynamic script, so that the script becomes available in the Sources tab allowing you to set break points to easily debug the code.

    For this to work, you need to provide the following comment at the end of your script:

    //# sourceURL=dynamicScript.js

    For example, here is a sample JavaScript code:

    function test() {
     console.log(“test”);
    }

    //# sourceURL=dynamicScript.js

    This will result in the dynamic file showing up in the Sources tab with the following name: dynamicScript.js.

    You’ll need to navigate once to the page to set the break point. The break point is hit even when you hit the refresh command or when you navigate in or out of the page.

    NOTE: This method only works with Google Chrome.

  • Copy and run your code directly in the Console tab of the browser developer tool to test and make changes to your code as required. You might have to switch to the multi-line mode in the Console tab of your browser dev tools to run your code if it does not support multiple lines of code by default.
    For more information about the multi-line mode in Microsoft Edge, see the The multiline command line section in Console Tool.

  • Add a debugger statement at the beginning of your script and dynamically add break points once the debugger statement is hit. You’ll however need to add the break points every time you load the page (via navigation or refresh command). This works best if you are trying to debug onChange handlers since the debug points persist so long as you are on the page. For more information, see JavaScript debugger Statement.

    NOTE: Remember to remove the debugger statement after you have tested and fixed all the issues in your JavaScript code, and are ready to publish your library in CRM.

Debugging your JavaScript code for CRM mobile clients

As with the Interactive Service Hub client, CRM injects your custom JavaScript code into one of the dynamic libraries, so you face the same challenge in debugging your code. However, the instructions to debug code for CRM mobile clients are different than the Interactive Service Hub client. For more information, see Debugging scripts for CRM for tablets.

Browser Developer Tools Reference

Developer Tools in Microsoft Edge

Developer Tools in Microsoft Internet Explorer

Developer Tools in Google Chrome

Developer Tool in Mozilla Firefox

Developer Tools in Apple Safari (Web Inspector)

 


Microsoft Dynamics CRM SDK Documentation Team


Source;

New documentation resources for Dynamics Marketing 2016 Update

SMS marketing is here!

The big news for this release is the introduction of mobile (SMS) marketing, which enables you to deliver instant text messages directly to marketing contacts on the move, regardless of whether they carry a smart phone or a traditional mobile phone. SMS marketing is new to Dynamics Marketing and might also be new to you, so it is important that you understand how it works and how to use it to deliver the greatest benefits for your organization. Our online documentation will help you get started:

  • Start by reading our SMS marketing overview, which will help you understand the terminology, technologies, and regulations that apply when doing SMS marketing.

  • Learn how to set up SMS keywords , which create an interactive SMS opt-in system that enables contacts to sign up for your newsletters and campaigns while ensuring compliance with local regulations.

  • When your contacts start signing up, you are ready to create and compose your SMS messages .

  • Integrate SMS messaging with your cross-media automated campaigns or send them directly to any marketing list that includes opted-in contacts.

  • Finally, inspect and analyze your SMS marketing results.

Design custom analytics and reports with expanded OData feeds and documentation

Though Dynamics Marketing provides a collection of pre-built reports and analytics features, many organizations choose to expand on these by creating customized, detailed, graphical reports based on OData feeds delivered live from Dynamics Marketing. Microsoft Power BI and Excel with Power Query are the tools that make this possible. With each release of Dynamics Marketing, we have expanded the collection of OData feeds available and now, to help you work more effectively with the available data, we have likewise expanded our OData feed documentation to include more technical details and all of the latest feeds.

Need help connecting to CRM? Check out our new connector troubleshooting and FAQ topic

In cooperation with Microsoft Support, we have collected solutions to the most commonly experienced problems and frequently asked questions related to integrating Dynamics Marketing with Dynamics CRM. They are now published in the new connector troubleshooting guide and FAQ .

Another good resource for information is the Dynamics Marketing Support Blog , which includes a five-part series on setting up the connector .

Note also that our standard connection installation and configuration documentation has moved from TechNet to the Dynamics Marketing customer center, where it is better integrated with our other user and administrator documentation. Be sure to update your bookmarks.

Inspect and copy HTML generated with the graphical email editor

When you create a marketing email using the drag-and-drop email editor, the system generates standard HTML to implement your design. The email maintenance page now provides a tab that lets you inspect the generated HTML and, if needed, copy it to be pasted and further developed using your favorite HTML editor. See the updated Create or view email marketing messages topic for details.

What else is new?

See the What’s new topic for a comprehensive overview of the major new features introduced in the Dynamics Marketing 2016 Update. The topic includes a brief summary of each feature together with links to documentation resources that provide full details about how to use it.

New to Dynamics Marketing? Get started quickly with these tutorials

Last summer we began issuing a series of step-by-step tutorials/walkthroughs designed to get new users started quickly with the most important features of Dynamics Marketing. Our fourth, and most recent, tutorial explores the many aspects of the Dynamics Marketing lead-scoring system. If you are new to Dynamics Marketing, then we recommend working through the entire series; each walkthrough builds on previous exercises and leverages the sample data that you create as you work. Here is the complete series:

Another good resource for new users is the Learn how to work and get around help topic, which introduces many of the common user-interface elements and working methods that you’ll employ while working in Microsoft Dynamics Marketing.

If you are primarily a Dynamics CRM user who uses Dynamics Marketing mostly to collaborate with your marketing professionals, then check out the Dynamics Marketing for Dynamics CRM users topic, which highlight collaboration features.

Video learning

For those who prefer videos to text-based resources, we provide a growing collection of videos on a wide range of Dynamics Marketing topics. Some videos are designed to give a broad overview of a particular feature area to sketch out possibilities, while others provide deep, step-by-step tutorials for accomplishing specific tasks. For a categorized list of videos, see our Videos & eBooks help topic.

Join the online community

To participate in an online community of Dynamics Managers users that also includes participation by consultants, expert users, Dynamics Marketing developers, program managers, and Microsoft Support, join the Dynamics Marketing Forum.

More documentation highlights and learning resources

Browse through the collection of technical articles and comprehensive online help. Each of our various customer center pages focuses on a particular audience and provides feature highlights and links to related documentation.


SMS marketing is here!

The big news for this release is the introduction of mobile (SMS) marketing, which enables you to deliver instant text messages directly to marketing contacts on the move, regardless of whether they carry a smart phone or a traditional mobile phone. SMS marketing is new to Dynamics Marketing and might also be new to you, so it is important that you understand how it works and how to use it to deliver the greatest benefits for your organization. Our online documentation will help you get started:

  • Start by reading our SMS marketing overview, which will help you understand the terminology, technologies, and regulations that apply when doing SMS marketing.

  • Learn how to set up SMS keywords , which create an interactive SMS opt-in system that enables contacts to sign up for your newsletters and campaigns while ensuring compliance with local regulations.

  • When your contacts start signing up, you are ready to create and compose your SMS messages .

  • Integrate SMS messaging with your cross-media automated campaigns or send them directly to any marketing list that includes opted-in contacts.

  • Finally, inspect and analyze your SMS marketing results.

Design custom analytics and reports with expanded OData feeds and documentation

Though Dynamics Marketing provides a collection of pre-built reports and analytics features, many organizations choose to expand on these by creating customized, detailed, graphical reports based on OData feeds delivered live from Dynamics Marketing. Microsoft Power BI and Excel with Power Query are the tools that make this possible. With each release of Dynamics Marketing, we have expanded the collection of OData feeds available and now, to help you work more effectively with the available data, we have likewise expanded our OData feed documentation to include more technical details and all of the latest feeds.

Need help connecting to CRM? Check out our new connector troubleshooting and FAQ topic

In cooperation with Microsoft Support, we have collected solutions to the most commonly experienced problems and frequently asked questions related to integrating Dynamics Marketing with Dynamics CRM. They are now published in the new connector troubleshooting guide and FAQ .

Another good resource for information is the Dynamics Marketing Support Blog , which includes a five-part series on setting up the connector .

Note also that our standard connection installation and configuration documentation has moved from TechNet to the Dynamics Marketing customer center, where it is better integrated with our other user and administrator documentation. Be sure to update your bookmarks.

Inspect and copy HTML generated with the graphical email editor

When you create a marketing email using the drag-and-drop email editor, the system generates standard HTML to implement your design. The email maintenance page now provides a tab that lets you inspect the generated HTML and, if needed, copy it to be pasted and further developed using your favorite HTML editor. See the updated Create or view email marketing messages topic for details.

What else is new?

See the What’s new topic for a comprehensive overview of the major new features introduced in the Dynamics Marketing 2016 Update. The topic includes a brief summary of each feature together with links to documentation resources that provide full details about how to use it.

New to Dynamics Marketing? Get started quickly with these tutorials

Last summer we began issuing a series of step-by-step tutorials/walkthroughs designed to get new users started quickly with the most important features of Dynamics Marketing. Our fourth, and most recent, tutorial explores the many aspects of the Dynamics Marketing lead-scoring system. If you are new to Dynamics Marketing, then we recommend working through the entire series; each walkthrough builds on previous exercises and leverages the sample data that you create as you work. Here is the complete series:

Another good resource for new users is the Learn how to work and get around help topic, which introduces many of the common user-interface elements and working methods that you’ll employ while working in Microsoft Dynamics Marketing.

If you are primarily a Dynamics CRM user who uses Dynamics Marketing mostly to collaborate with your marketing professionals, then check out the Dynamics Marketing for Dynamics CRM users topic, which highlight collaboration features.

Video learning

For those who prefer videos to text-based resources, we provide a growing collection of videos on a wide range of Dynamics Marketing topics. Some videos are designed to give a broad overview of a particular feature area to sketch out possibilities, while others provide deep, step-by-step tutorials for accomplishing specific tasks. For a categorized list of videos, see our Videos & eBooks help topic.

Join the online community

To participate in an online community of Dynamics Managers users that also includes participation by consultants, expert users, Dynamics Marketing developers, program managers, and Microsoft Support, join the Dynamics Marketing Forum.

More documentation highlights and learning resources

Browse through the collection of technical articles and comprehensive online help. Each of our various customer center pages focuses on a particular audience and provides feature highlights and links to related documentation.


Source;

Knowledge article lifecycle: An introduction

The introduction of the Knowledge Article entity in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 comes with many new and exciting features designed to bring strong knowledge management capabilities into Dynamics CRM. I am excited to explain a little bit more about the lifecycle, which is a key concept in the new Knowledge Article entity. I will cover the newly introduced states, roles, and privileges in the new knowledge management feature. Let’s get started!

Knowledge Article is a new entity introduced in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 to bring knowledge management capabilities into services organizations. There is support for rich content authoring, versioning, translations, and other features designed to empower organizations to better capture, maintain, and incorporate knowledge into every aspect of their organization. For a full outline of all capabilities introduced with Knowledge Article, see:

Knowledge Management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Release

A knowledge lifecycle walkthrough

In a typical organization, a knowledge lifecycle could be covered by several different teams (customer service representative, content authors, and content reviewers) and might look something like this:

  • A customer service representative resolves a case and proposes a Draft version of a knowledge article.
  • The customer Service representative submits the knowledge article for review by an approver.
  • The approver approves the article, which sets the article into the Approve State. 

Figure 1. The confirmation dialog for Approve command

  • The publisher reviews the approved knowledge article and sets the publish date and expiration date for the article, and also specifies whether publishing should cascade to all approved translations. Figure 2. Publish dialog options
  • The publisher moves the article into scheduled state for publication.
  • A system job moves the scheduled article to the Published state on the specified publishing date.
  • The knowledge article is now consumable based on the permissions set.

 

Figure 3. Homepage grid displaying Published Articles view

  • A system job moves the published article to the Expired state on the specified expiration date.
  • A content reviewer moves the article to the Draft state and provides feedback on revisions needed.

A knowledge article may go through many revisions, approvals, and reviews in the lifecycle. In many cases, after a knowledge article is expired, it goes back through the process of additional approvals to be republished. This flow is depicted in the below cycle: 

Figure 4. Simple lifecycle flow for a knowledge article

While this illustration is a very high-level view of the actions that take place throughout the lifecycle of an article, it does capture the essence of each stage in the process. The knowledge article may eventually reach a point where it no longer needs to be published. The knowledge article can then be archived or discarded according to business preferences.

There are two notable additions to the process of knowledge management: versioning and translations of Knowledge Articles. These are explained in more detail here:

Dynamics CRM 2016 Knowledge Article Translations

State-based modeling

Knowledge articles will be leveraging the underlying State Code concept in CRM to provide a modeling of the many states a knowledge article could be in within the Lifecycle. Below are the new state codes that are introduced as part of the knowledge article entity:

State Code

Status Codes

Permission Required

Draft

Proposed, Draft, Needs Review, In Review

 

Approved

Approved

Approve Knowledge Articles

Scheduled

Scheduled

 

Published

Published, Needs Review, Updating

Publish Knowledge Articles

Expired

Expired, Rejected

 

Archived

Archived

 

Discarded

Discarded, Rejected

 

 Table 1. Out-of-the-box state codes and information

The above table defines the out-of-the-box status codes that are associated with each state code and denotes the special permissions required to enter a state code (if applicable). In this section, I’ll touch on the new business process flows, how to transition through the various states, and each of the state code’s intended usage scenarios.

Business process flows

The knowledge article provides two out-of-the-box business process flows that will walk users through the basic lifecycle of a knowledge article. There is one for knowledge articles, which starts at the Draft State and walks the user through the necessary stages to have a knowledge article published. You’ll notice that the Active stage of the process (depicted below) has several steps that require completion before moving to the next stage in the process. The processes are designed to help a user go through the correct steps for publishing. You can change the states by using the command bar buttons, which are explained further below. 

Figure 5. New knowledge article business process flow

The second process is for knowledge articles that have expired and need to be reviewed and sent back through the lifecycle for publishing. The new knowledge article process is automatically transitioned to the expired process once the knowledge article has expired. The Process will revert to the new knowledge article process once the knowledge article has been reverted to the Draft state.

Changing states

Transitioning states from the interactive service hub is performed through the command bar buttons, which are present above the editing area. Only state transitions that are valid for the current context are presented on the command bar. 

Figure 6. Where to change the state of a knowledge article

It’s always easy to know which state a knowledge article is in at a glance in the interactive service hub. Take a look at the notification bar at the bottom to see this. 

 

Figure 7. Footer depicting current status of a knowledge article

You can also set the status reason within each state to provide more detailed insight into the current state of the knowledge article. You can do this in the header of the knowledge article form. 

Figure 8. Changing the status reason for a state

Quick overview of the states

  • The Draft state is where new knowledge articles are born! Proposed articles, drafts, and articles needing review are Draft knowledge articles. All newly created knowledge articles are in Draft state and require Create permissions to create a new article.
  • Approved state is for knowledge articles that have been reviewed and marked as Approved. Note that one requires a special “Approve Knowledge Articles” permission to approve an article.
  • Scheduled state is for knowledge articles that have been scheduled for publishing and that are picked up automatically by the auto-publish job when the publish Date/Time has reached.
  • Published state is for knowledge articles that are marked for consumption either internally or externally based upon the permissions set for the knowledge article.
  • Expired state is reached when knowledge articles reach their set expiration date and the desired expiration state is marked as Expired. These knowledge articles should be reviewed to determine if they need to be updated, republished, or archived based on business needs.
  • Archived state is for knowledge articles that don’t currently serve a business case but have some value that should be preserved.
  • Discarded state should be used for knowledge articles that are okay to delete. This serves as a symbolic recycle bin for knowledge articles to be deleted.

Roles and permissions

There is a quick callout regarding permissions that I would like to highlight. There is an entirely new Security Role added called Knowledge Manager. There are also two new permissions introduced specifically for knowledge article. Let’s look at both of these in more detail.

Knowledge Manager role

The Knowledge Manager is the security role defined for a user who is designated as the curator of knowledge management. This security role has the Create, Approve, and Publish permissions on knowledge articles for consumption. If this level of permission is not suitable for your organization’s needs, they can be tailored. Find more details on editing security roles here:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn531130.aspx

Knowledge article privileges

We have also introduced two new privileges for the Knowledge Article entity, which allow for fine-tuning control over who is allowed to both approve and publish knowledge articles. By default, the Knowledge Manager role has both these privileges. In the following figure, you can see the newly introduced privileges. 

Figure 9. Knowledge article privileges for the Knowledge Manager role

This role should only be assigned to users that require both the ability to approve and publish knowledge articles. Another use case for many businesses would be to define two separate security roles to effectively define a separation of privileges: one role having permissions to approve and other for having permission to publish knowledge articles. 

Until next time,

James Calhoun

The introduction of the Knowledge Article entity in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 comes with many new and exciting features designed to bring strong knowledge management capabilities into Dynamics CRM. I am excited to explain a little bit more about the lifecycle, which is a key concept in the new Knowledge Article entity. I will cover the newly introduced states, roles, and privileges in the new knowledge management feature. Let’s get started!

Knowledge Article is a new entity introduced in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 to bring knowledge management capabilities into services organizations. There is support for rich content authoring, versioning, translations, and other features designed to empower organizations to better capture, maintain, and incorporate knowledge into every aspect of their organization. For a full outline of all capabilities introduced with Knowledge Article, see:

Knowledge Management in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2016 Release

A knowledge lifecycle walkthrough

In a typical organization, a knowledge lifecycle could be covered by several different teams (customer service representative, content authors, and content reviewers) and might look something like this:

  • A customer service representative resolves a case and proposes a Draft version of a knowledge article.
  • The customer Service representative submits the knowledge article for review by an approver.
  • The approver approves the article, which sets the article into the Approve State. 

Figure 1. The confirmation dialog for Approve command

  • The publisher reviews the approved knowledge article and sets the publish date and expiration date for the article, and also specifies whether publishing should cascade to all approved translations. Figure 2. Publish dialog options
  • The publisher moves the article into scheduled state for publication.
  • A system job moves the scheduled article to the Published state on the specified publishing date.
  • The knowledge article is now consumable based on the permissions set.

 

Figure 3. Homepage grid displaying Published Articles view

  • A system job moves the published article to the Expired state on the specified expiration date.
  • A content reviewer moves the article to the Draft state and provides feedback on revisions needed.

A knowledge article may go through many revisions, approvals, and reviews in the lifecycle. In many cases, after a knowledge article is expired, it goes back through the process of additional approvals to be republished. This flow is depicted in the below cycle: 

Figure 4. Simple lifecycle flow for a knowledge article

While this illustration is a very high-level view of the actions that take place throughout the lifecycle of an article, it does capture the essence of each stage in the process. The knowledge article may eventually reach a point where it no longer needs to be published. The knowledge article can then be archived or discarded according to business preferences.

There are two notable additions to the process of knowledge management: versioning and translations of Knowledge Articles. These are explained in more detail here:

Dynamics CRM 2016 Knowledge Article Translations

State-based modeling

Knowledge articles will be leveraging the underlying State Code concept in CRM to provide a modeling of the many states a knowledge article could be in within the Lifecycle. Below are the new state codes that are introduced as part of the knowledge article entity:

State Code

Status Codes

Permission Required

Draft

Proposed, Draft, Needs Review, In Review

 

Approved

Approved

Approve Knowledge Articles

Scheduled

Scheduled

 

Published

Published, Needs Review, Updating

Publish Knowledge Articles

Expired

Expired, Rejected

 

Archived

Archived

 

Discarded

Discarded, Rejected

 

 Table 1. Out-of-the-box state codes and information

The above table defines the out-of-the-box status codes that are associated with each state code and denotes the special permissions required to enter a state code (if applicable). In this section, I’ll touch on the new business process flows, how to transition through the various states, and each of the state code’s intended usage scenarios.

Business process flows

The knowledge article provides two out-of-the-box business process flows that will walk users through the basic lifecycle of a knowledge article. There is one for knowledge articles, which starts at the Draft State and walks the user through the necessary stages to have a knowledge article published. You’ll notice that the Active stage of the process (depicted below) has several steps that require completion before moving to the next stage in the process. The processes are designed to help a user go through the correct steps for publishing. You can change the states by using the command bar buttons, which are explained further below. 

Figure 5. New knowledge article business process flow

The second process is for knowledge articles that have expired and need to be reviewed and sent back through the lifecycle for publishing. The new knowledge article process is automatically transitioned to the expired process once the knowledge article has expired. The Process will revert to the new knowledge article process once the knowledge article has been reverted to the Draft state.

Changing states

Transitioning states from the interactive service hub is performed through the command bar buttons, which are present above the editing area. Only state transitions that are valid for the current context are presented on the command bar. 

Figure 6. Where to change the state of a knowledge article

It’s always easy to know which state a knowledge article is in at a glance in the interactive service hub. Take a look at the notification bar at the bottom to see this. 

 

Figure 7. Footer depicting current status of a knowledge article

You can also set the status reason within each state to provide more detailed insight into the current state of the knowledge article. You can do this in the header of the knowledge article form. 

Figure 8. Changing the status reason for a state

Quick overview of the states

  • The Draft state is where new knowledge articles are born! Proposed articles, drafts, and articles needing review are Draft knowledge articles. All newly created knowledge articles are in Draft state and require Create permissions to create a new article.
  • Approved state is for knowledge articles that have been reviewed and marked as Approved. Note that one requires a special “Approve Knowledge Articles” permission to approve an article.
  • Scheduled state is for knowledge articles that have been scheduled for publishing and that are picked up automatically by the auto-publish job when the publish Date/Time has reached.
  • Published state is for knowledge articles that are marked for consumption either internally or externally based upon the permissions set for the knowledge article.
  • Expired state is reached when knowledge articles reach their set expiration date and the desired expiration state is marked as Expired. These knowledge articles should be reviewed to determine if they need to be updated, republished, or archived based on business needs.
  • Archived state is for knowledge articles that don’t currently serve a business case but have some value that should be preserved.
  • Discarded state should be used for knowledge articles that are okay to delete. This serves as a symbolic recycle bin for knowledge articles to be deleted.

Roles and permissions

There is a quick callout regarding permissions that I would like to highlight. There is an entirely new Security Role added called Knowledge Manager. There are also two new permissions introduced specifically for knowledge article. Let’s look at both of these in more detail.

Knowledge Manager role

The Knowledge Manager is the security role defined for a user who is designated as the curator of knowledge management. This security role has the Create, Approve, and Publish permissions on knowledge articles for consumption. If this level of permission is not suitable for your organization’s needs, they can be tailored. Find more details on editing security roles here:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn531130.aspx

Knowledge article privileges

We have also introduced two new privileges for the Knowledge Article entity, which allow for fine-tuning control over who is allowed to both approve and publish knowledge articles. By default, the Knowledge Manager role has both these privileges. In the following figure, you can see the newly introduced privileges. 

Figure 9. Knowledge article privileges for the Knowledge Manager role

This role should only be assigned to users that require both the ability to approve and publish knowledge articles. Another use case for many businesses would be to define two separate security roles to effectively define a separation of privileges: one role having permissions to approve and other for having permission to publish knowledge articles. 

Until next time,

James Calhoun


Source;

Exciting new features in Microsoft Social Engagement 2016 Update 1.1

We’re excited to share the news for the features included in the upcoming release. Microsoft Social Engagement now includes a detailed view of an author’s Twitter profile. Posts you publish from within Social Engagement now support photos. You can extend your sources coverage by adding public RSS or Atom feeds and analyze them like any other post. Additionally, Social Engagement now supports the capabilities of Office Groups to collaborate with other users. Stay tuned for more news!

See details about authors on Twitter

Let’s check out author details. In Social Center, click the author details icon in any tweet. Right away you’ll see a detailed view of the author’s profile. You can get an idea of how influential and active the author is based on their reach score, their followers, and how many tweets they’ve posted. Review the hash tags they use most, and their recent tweets to understand the topics that interest them. If you decide this is someone you want to follow, just link the social profile you want to follow the author with. 

Include photos in your posts

Direct publishing is another cool feature in Social Center. It lets you tweet or post to Facebook right from within Social Engagement. Let’s say your sales person wants to share a white paper or your marketing team wants to announce the agenda for an upcoming conference. Click the Publish tab in Social Center and pick the social media source you want to publish to. Then pick the social profile to post on behalf of. Type the announcement text and add media if you want—let’s include the conference flyer and publish. On the confirmation page, click the link to see the post on the source you published to. You can also post the same message on other sources or social profiles from here.

Extend your data coverage with custom sources

Social Engagement supports popular social media sources right out of the box. However, some customers prefer sources that are specific to a brand, company, or industry. Use custom sources and add public RSS or Atom feeds to listen and analyze those conversations so you can hear what they are saying about your company, and engage more effectively.

Collaborate in Social Engagement using Office Groups

Finally, with the addition of Office Groups in Social Engagement, you can create and manage Office Groups in Exchange, or in your Office Admin Portal. Once you do that, those groups are available in Social Engagement for assigning posts or sharing streams and social profiles.

Here’s an example. A customer posts about an installation issue, and the Field Installation group is great with issues like this. Click “Assign To” and use keyword search or filtering to quickly find the Field Installation group. Now, everyone in the Field Installation group can see the post in their Inbox and act on it.

Get help, videos, and eBooks

For more information about Microsoft Social Engagement, including help articles, eBooks, and videos, see the Microsoft Social Engagement Help Center.

We’re convinced you’re going to love the new features. 

Enjoy!

Microsoft Social Engagement Team 

We’re excited to share the news for the features included in the upcoming release. Microsoft Social Engagement now includes a detailed view of an author’s Twitter profile. Posts you publish from within Social Engagement now support photos. You can extend your sources coverage by adding public RSS or Atom feeds and analyze them like any other post. Additionally, Social Engagement now supports the capabilities of Office Groups to collaborate with other users. Stay tuned for more news!

See details about authors on Twitter

Let’s check out author details. In Social Center, click the author details icon in any tweet. Right away you’ll see a detailed view of the author’s profile. You can get an idea of how influential and active the author is based on their reach score, their followers, and how many tweets they’ve posted. Review the hash tags they use most, and their recent tweets to understand the topics that interest them. If you decide this is someone you want to follow, just link the social profile you want to follow the author with. 

Include photos in your posts

Direct publishing is another cool feature in Social Center. It lets you tweet or post to Facebook right from within Social Engagement. Let’s say your sales person wants to share a white paper or your marketing team wants to announce the agenda for an upcoming conference. Click the Publish tab in Social Center and pick the social media source you want to publish to. Then pick the social profile to post on behalf of. Type the announcement text and add media if you want—let’s include the conference flyer and publish. On the confirmation page, click the link to see the post on the source you published to. You can also post the same message on other sources or social profiles from here.

Extend your data coverage with custom sources

Social Engagement supports popular social media sources right out of the box. However, some customers prefer sources that are specific to a brand, company, or industry. Use custom sources and add public RSS or Atom feeds to listen and analyze those conversations so you can hear what they are saying about your company, and engage more effectively.

Collaborate in Social Engagement using Office Groups

Finally, with the addition of Office Groups in Social Engagement, you can create and manage Office Groups in Exchange, or in your Office Admin Portal. Once you do that, those groups are available in Social Engagement for assigning posts or sharing streams and social profiles.

Here’s an example. A customer posts about an installation issue, and the Field Installation group is great with issues like this. Click “Assign To” and use keyword search or filtering to quickly find the Field Installation group. Now, everyone in the Field Installation group can see the post in their Inbox and act on it.

Get help, videos, and eBooks

For more information about Microsoft Social Engagement, including help articles, eBooks, and videos, see the Microsoft Social Engagement Help Center.

We’re convinced you’re going to love the new features. 

Enjoy!

Microsoft Social Engagement Team 


Source;